The Definitive History of the T-Shirt

Today the modern T-shirt has spawned a vast textile and fashion industry, worth over two-billion dollars to the world's retail trade. The unlikely birth of the t-shirt was a rather unspectacular event, however, this humble piece of attire was set to change the styles and fashions of cultures for generations to come. Eventually, the T-Shirt would be used as a political tool for protest and in certain times and places in history, as a symbol of revolution and change.

At the very beginning, the t-shirt was little more than a piece of underwear, an extremely utilitarian one at that. In the late 19th century the union suit, (also colloquially known as long John's), was in its heyday, worn across America and northern parts of Europe. In order to buy the T-shirt, you can simply visit https://aurorasstudio.com/

Popular throughout class and generation, this modest knitted one-piece covered the whole body, from the neck to the wrists and ankles. The design pièce de résistance featured a drop flap in the back for ease of use in the old outhouse. As cotton became more and more widely available, underwear manufacturers seized the moment to create an alternative to this mainstay and rather cumbersome design. Knitted material is difficult to cut and sew seams and thus with cotton a radical shift towards mass-made fashion could begin.

Historical researchers define the first recorded incident of the introduction of the T-shirt to the United States occurred during World War One when US soldiers remarked upon the light cotton undershirts European soldiers were issued as standard uniforms.

American soldiers were fuming, their government was still issuing woolen uniforms, this wasn't a fashion, it was practically a tactical military disadvantage. How could a sniper keep still and aim his rifle with beads of sweat pouring in his eyes, and an itch that just wouldn't go away? The US army may not have reacted as quickly as their troops would have liked, but the highly practical and light t-shirt would soon make its way back to the mainstream American consumer.